Wednesday, 8 February 2017

How is it some hotels get things so wrong?

I never cease to be amazed at how hotels can manage to get so many of the basics wrong.

From the snotty buffoon who checked me in at Melbourne's Crown Metropol a couple of weeks ago, to being charged $30 a day for the use of ludicrously slow wifi in Sydney, there are an awful lot of hotels that don't even seem to be trying to be hospitable.

One thing every hotel should do, for instance, is make sure that guests can easily find their intended address. I'm not even sure which one is the Park Hyatt in Melbourne and which one is the Grand Hyatt. I don't know if there is a Hyatt Regency or not.

Nuo Hotel Beijing, or Beijing Hotel Nuo?
That makes the behaviour of Chinese luxury hotel brand Nuo Hotels almost unbelievable.

It currently has a Nuo Hotel Beijing. But now it has purchased the former Grand Hotel de Pekin and Raffles Hotel, it has renamed it  - wait for it - Beijing Hotel Nuo.

Yep, that's right. Instead of giving it an identifier like north, south, east, west or central, it has given it a name almost identical to its sibling.

All of which simply makes things hard for anyone who doesn't speak fluent Chinese. Imagine trying to explain to a taxi driver the difference between the Nuo Hotel Beijing and the Beijing Hotel Nuo.

That's a big fail - one clearly decided by a clown who does not stay in hotels.

And Hyatt is back in the act in Sydney with the opening of the new Hyatt Regency Hotel in what used to be the Four Points by Sheraton Darling Harbour. I wonder how many guests will end up here when they are actually booked into the Park Hyatt in the Rocks, or vice versa?

What would be wrong with Hyatt Regency Darling Harbour, or Park Hyatt Waterside?

It's just plain stoopid, particularly if you are a confused Japanese or Chinese tourist, the market segment the city is trying to woo.


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