Wednesday, 13 May 2015

Newcastle: a great city for a stroll

A few weeks ago I wrote about Newcastle's resurgence as gourmet destination. During my brief stay in the city I also spent a lot of time exploring on foot (fear of booze buses rather a sudden need for exercise). 

Now the good folk at Newcastle Tourism have unveiled some new walking tours that explore various facets of the city. All you need is basic fitness and some time to spare - and there are some great bars and eateries to pop into along each walk.


Newcastle Memorial Walk
For panoramic viewa of the city and the surf – with a dose of history – stroll the region’s newest attraction, the Newcastle Memorial Walk. It was officially opened on the eve of Anzac Day 2015 and the walkway offers views from the coastline to the valley, not to mention a view of the city lights after dusk that’s hard to beat. Newcastle Memorial Walk features a series of soldier silhouettes and the names of thousands of locals who enlisted from the Newcastle area. 


Artists’ City Walking Tour
Setting off on foot isn’t just for nature lovers, it’s also a fabulous way to see the downtown area with fresh eyes. Newcastle is a city that has always supported, hosted and inspired artists and public art (including some great graffiti). The self-guided Artists’ City Walking Tour begins at Obelisk Park - one of iconic artist Margaret Olley’s favourite drawing spots - before taking in a range of galleries and public art sites before concluding at the impressive Newcastle Art Gallery


Convict and Industry Walking Tour
To explore Newcastle’s early years as a convict settlement and visit remnants of the city’s great industrial origins, take the Convict and Industry Walking Tour. Beginning at the Convict Lumber Yard, the walk takes in significant archaeological sites from the city’s convict past and concludes at the Newcastle Museum, a fascinating space full of artefacts from the region’s industrial and convict heritage.

Newcastle at War
A self-guided walking tour, Newcastle at War invites visitors to delve deep into the city’s war-time tales. Beginning at iconic Fort Scratchley and finishing at the Newcastle War Memorial Cultural Centre at the city’s library.

Two-wheel alternative
For those who prefer to explore on two wheels, why not hire a bike from Interbike’s station at Crowne Plaza in the heart of the Honeysuckle precinct? 

Further information on Newcastle’s walking tracks and trails, including maps and guides, can be found at www.visitnewcastle.com.au/maps-guides

No comments:

Post a Comment